Printable Pattern Files

Printable Full Size Pattern files have been reformatted for plotting to roll paper.  They mirror the gemeority of the CNC cutting files and convey information essential fabrication information that cannot be conveyed by CNC files were such information would be rejected by the CNC machine software.

Full size pattern are AutoCad (dwg) files save to a PDF file format enabling them to be easily printed full size by any 'Commercial Printer' being the file format that is the standard of the printing industry. 

They can be view, by you, in a PDF reader such as 'Acrobat DC' which can be downloaded free from 'ADOBE'.  'Acrobat DC' is a full featured viewing program give you the ability to measure distances and angles between any endpoint and intersections of lines on the drawing.

As with the CNC files there are three groups of parts:  Shell Plating, Transverse frames and Longintudinal frames.


Typical Full Size Shell Pattern

Full size Shell Plate Pattern include essential fabrication information that cannot be conveyed by CNC cutting files, since cutting machine software is only interested in the perimeter and cutout within the parts.  Shown below is a representation of several sections of shell plating for the Bezier 12.5, which will be printed onto roll paper 24" wide. 


Typical Full Size Transverse Frame Patterns

As with full size paper patterns the Transverse frames include fabrication information that cannot be conveyed by CNC cutting.  Shown below is a representation of transverse frames printed onto roll paper 24" wide.


Typical Full Size Longintudinal Frame Patterns

As with full size shell and transverse frame printed paper patterns information is conveyed that cannot in CNC files.  Shown below is a representation of the longintudinal patterns for the Bezier 12.5 printed on roll paper 36" x 190".

The length of longintudinals being the length of the plot reveals any error in its calcubration.  For example, if the printer-plotter has an error of .030" - 1/32" over 25" the comulative error over 200" would be .250" or 1/4".  Therefore in the case of longintudinal plots the cumulative error over the length of the plot is measurable. 

However, the majority of parts have have a dimension much less than the length.  For example a part with an overall length or width of 50" the cummulative error would be .060" or 1/16".  As the dimension of the part decreases so does the inherent error of the printer as applied to that part decreases. 

As with all custom metal fabrication there is a little tuck and fit necessary along the way. If for example, your 16' 0" longintudinal printed out at 16' 1/4" it would be approproate to just remove 1/8" off each end of the longintudinal and open up the notches in that longintudinal at their intersecting transverse frame locations?

Moral of the story is to have your printing done by a established provider.




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